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Acetyl-L-Carnitine: CLP for your Brain

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Acetyl-L-Carnitine: Nootropic and Utility Supplement

Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR) is the Acetyl variant of L-Carnitine. Your body synthesizes L-Carnitine from meat. The Acetyl property of ALCAR allows your body to pass it readily through the brain blood barrier. L-Carnitine is useful as an athletic supplement where ALCAR is useful in the nootropic role. (Examine n.d.) We included ALCAR in Warheads on Foreheads (WHOF) for two major reasons.

ALCAR is a Powerful Anti-Oxidant

For reference rust is iron oxidation – biological processes are very different, but it’s a good starting point. You can think of the normal Grunt life environment as a saltwater bath for your brain. Don’t let your brain turn into this cannon:

rusty cannon

If you take a quick look at the NALT article (another ingredient of WHOF) you can see an example of how a neurotransmitter chain can produce oxidation in the brain and the bad effects this can cause. Brain oxidation conducts all forms of nefarious activities detrimental to your cognitive strategic goals. Many neurotransmitter chains you use on an everyday basis end in oxidized molecules hanging out in your brain wreaking havoc. Brain oxidation is bad and ALCAR helps deal with the problem. ALCAR is a very powerful anti-oxidant specifically useful for protecting the brain from the oxidation problem. (Braintropic n.d.)

Some caution on the antioxidant problem set: your body does produce a lot of antioxidants. Humans have lived for centuries without getting rusty brains. Antioxidants are somewhat of a fad. WHOF includes anti-oxidants for specific functions. Dumping anti-oxidants into your body all willy-nilly may be a bad idea. Check this article out for some good background. The application in WHOF is balanced for the infantry and high stress problem set. This is one of the many reasons we advise exercising while taking WHOF – it creates the proper conditions for the application. Exercise is the best way to increase brain function, better than any supplement.

ALCAR and the choline system

One of the primary functions of WHOF is to increase the performance of your cholinergic system. The cholinergic system is key for learning, memory and mental plasticity. (Schliebs and Arendt 2006) Alot of Alzheimer’s medications focus on this system. A natural minded Alzheimer’s medication would have a similar composition to WHOF. Boosting the cholinergic system is critical if you intend to reach a higher level of cognitive performance.

A connection many Grunt types will likely have to the cholinergic system: nicotine (smoking, dip) brute forces the Acetylcholine receptors in the brain. That’s why nicotine improves focus, learning and attentiveness. The way nicotine does this is not optimal, opening the receptors to one neurotransmitter means others are blocked off and other important brain systems are performing poorly. Also, smoking and dipping are bad for you. There must be a better solution. We all know problems aren’t getting easier, the force is getting spread thinner and we can’t throw sleep at the problem.

ALCAR helps in the synthesis of Acetylcholine. (Schliebs and Arendt 2006) Acetylcholine is the main thing we want to promote for better cognitive performance. Here’s how WHOF works the problem:

  • Alpha-GPC provides a bioavailable source of choline in the brain
  • ALCAR assists in the synthesis
  • GABA regulates the system
  • Huperzine-A inhibits the breakdown of Acetylcholine (making the previous system more efficient)
  • Bocopa assists in the development of new connections the system can use

Warheads on Foreheads is a well thought out cholinergic booster. We highly recommend you give it a try.

 

References

Braintropic. n.d. ACETYL-L-CARNITINE. Accessed May 4, 2017. https://www.braintropic.com/nootropics/acetyl-l-carnitine/.

Examine. n.d. L-Carnitine. Accessed May 4, 2017. https://examine.com/supplements/l-carnitine/.

Schliebs, R, and T Arendt. 2006. The significance of the cholinergic system in the brain during aging and in Alzheimer’s disease. Accessed May 5, 2017. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00702-006-0579-2.

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